The College Football Playoff "Committee" is a bad joke that keeps repeating itself



College Football desperately needs impartial leadership to determine its best teams. Plain and simple, there's no other hyperbolic way to say it. The game is broken.


The 2021 season has brought us a lot of things 10 weeks in and really the only thing we know for sure is that the Georgia Bulldogs are currently the best team in all the land. They may not finish the season there, but right now, you can't debate that anyone is better on the field. Of that, there is no question.


What is a question is who are the other three teams good enough to make it to the popularity invitational?


Somehow, the first College Football Playoff "poll" which was released Tuesday managed to start more arguments than it resolved.


Two of the top four teams are currently undefeated: #1 Georgia and #3 Michigan State. Georgia is unquestioned. Michigan State, um, maybe they deserve it, maybe they don't. Right now, today, sure, why not.


The question's we all "non-experts" have is #2 Alabama and #4 Oregon. Both have losses. Alabama lost to a Texas A&M team that is ranked #14. Oregon, sure, the Ducks beat Ohio State in week 1. But they lost to a mediocre Stanford team that is not even ranked and they've struggled nearly every week.


Left out in all of this: Undefeated and unchallenged Cincinnati. Why? Because Cincinnati is not a "Power 5" team. Never mind that the Bearcats dominated #10 Notre Dame at Notre Dame. They beat Indiana from the Big 10 pretty soundly too.


THIS is the overriding problem in college football. It's entirely dependent on "Rankings". The ranking of football teams by its nature is a completely arbitrary process based totally on opinion. That is a problem. A big problem. College Football has largely for most of its existence, emerged as largely a popularity contest decided by people who may or may not have seen or have in depth knowledge of the teams they are supposedly evaluating.


That's the fatal flaw.


Sure, the game has other glaring issues: The transfer portal, no real enforcement of the bigger programs and a world in which the rich get richer and everyone else is left picking up the crumbs. Yeah, I guess it is a mirror of our current society, isn't it?


How the Cincinnati Bearcats could be ranked #6 is mind boggling to me. So what they don't play in the SEC. Who cares that they don't play in the Big 10 East. I would bet money they'd be competitive in either or both.


Yet here we are.


There are a handful of people whining about Oklahoma being ranked #8, just go away. The Sooners are extremely lucky to be in the Top 10 without a loss. Incredibly lucky.


My point here is this: College Football's "Playoff" system is still broken. It's a deeply flawed system. Deeply. Don't give me this crap about coaches and athletic directors choosing based on strength of schedule etc. That means nothing. It is a popularity contest plain and simple. It always has been and unless something changes, it always will be.


Picking teams because they are more marketable on a national basis is great if your fans are looking strictly for the most popular teams. It's proof you are pandering to ESPN. It's a disservice to fans. It's a disservice to the players and a disservice to the coaches.


If every team this season wins out in the regular season, I can already tell you who the playoff teams will be: Georgia, Alabama, Ohio State and either Oregon or Oklahoma. Michigan State isn't on this list because I don't believe they'll beat Ohio State in Columbus later in November.


Those four teams were likely going to be here before the season started because, that's how College Football now works. Yeah, sure it makes them money, but at some point the fans are going to rebel. Why would you be following a sport where you know who the winners are going to be?


That's the part the game needs to figure out if it wants to be what it aspires to. Being thought of the same as the NFL.

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